A Pathway Out of Poverty

Is education a right or a privilege? This is one of the most pertinent topics discussed. To address this topic we first need to understand the definition. Education is the transmission of knowledge, values, and habits. It is not merely a matter of book learning, but rather how the acquisition of knowledge can be applied in our daily lives.





Beyond earning a good living, education is important as it brings respect and confidence. Concerning respect, a person with a public figure needs to be educated before an authority to gain support and admiration from the public. In today’s society, education seems to be a safe decision knowing that it gives an educated person an assured life.





With this in mind, is education perceived as a right or privilege? The reason why people believe it should be a human right is because gender, nationality, race or any other factor should not hinder a person from learning. Even though education is officially said to be a right, it can also be classified as a privilege in some cases. The difference lies in the issue of money with reference to families in less industrialised countries. Since some families do not have a high standard of living, they are unable to provide education for their children. This shifts education being a privilege because one might not be wealthy enough to receive support for their education.





Whether it is a right or privilege, there are children from urban poor communities with limited access to quality education as they lack the resources to improve their studies. When children’s needs are not met that support their access to education, they are unable to achieve minimum standards for their Bahasa Malaysia and English subjects to stay in school. Once they dropped out of school, they will end up with low-paying jobs and this poses an issue in the long run as they would constantly get trapped in the cycle of poverty.

For this reason, a non-profit organization Generasi Gemilang (GG) was inspired to aid children and families in the underprivileged communities by carrying out a host of education programmes. Designed to break the cycle of poverty, they aim to increase access to quality education and help those children realise their potential. Through improving the children’s academic performance and equipping them with 21st century skills, success is measured when poverty-stricken families flourish to communities with a purpose in life.





If you are interested in contributing to the under-served communities and help them receive better education opportunities, check out https://www.gengemilang.org

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